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20121224
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
on this, i think i'm a little to her left on a lot of thers foreign policy issues like iraq and the middle east. she's positioned herself just where you want to be, a notch or two to the right of obama on foreign policy, vis-a-vis netanyahu. she never took back her support for the iraq war. it seems to me she's notched pretty close to the model there politically, a good place to run against any republican. >> let's see about that because by that teary if you go all the way back to when the kts first made it to the national stage, bill clinton should have been the favorite of the republicans at the brought the democratic party away from the left and into the middle. instead, of course, you had the bill clinton years were just like the obama years. >> you see this happening again? swrooim saying they're going to find something. it's not always logical, not always about it's this issue -- >> let's get back to the visceral part. not just we're going to run against her because she could potentially be the democratic standard bearer but are we going to hate her? i agree with you -- rana this is
. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. (instrumental music) >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring america's to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, sacred cow: defending america on a budget. (instrumental music) (marching music) >> the u.s. spent the last century fighting well-defined wars against well-heeled enemies. ♪ stop! >> duck and cover up under the table. first you duck and then you cover. >> but the fall of the berlin wall meant the collapse of the traditional enemy and the military struggled to find its purpose in this post soviet world. >> we have to understand the role that the united states has played since the end of the second world war and
a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll nominate? caller: obama. host: what makes him your hero? caller: we were on a major slide when he came
things that happens while kennedy is alive that has a very important impact on foreign policy is the assassination of the president of south vietnam. our client, our ally over there. and then two weeks later, i think it's two weeks later, kennedy is himself assassinated. and as you were saying before, this raised the questions that historians can argue about, keep arguing about, the next 50 years, would kennedy have wanted to -- would he have pulled american troops out of vietnam dish pull adviseers out, and you -- indications are that he would have and you cite various sources.that. just curious, just to challenge that a little bit, there's a wonderful book by a diploma called, "choosing war" in which he says that viet cong attacks were doubling in november from the month above in south vietnam. and that there were meetings of kennedy's top advicers in honolulu, which is -- which i think finished up the day before kennedy was assassinated -- a great film -- and they warn the viet cong is going to win if the u.s. didn't do something very quickly. so, not to challenge the memor
to get political advantage. >> all right, a look at war and foreign policy in 2012. >> this time of war began in afghanistan, and this is where it will end. >> afghanistan is now the nation's longest war. more than two dozen americans have died in fighting it. in 2012, the president promised that the end was in sight. what did our brave young men and women in uniform achieve in afghanistan in the year 2012? >> we lost a lot. we lost a lot. we can say that they did find and they did get osama bin laden, but they are paying a terrible price. >> was the idea to get rid of al qaeda? and now they are fighting the taliban? how long does this go on? what is the rationale? >> i think the rationale disappeared years ago. i think obama had an opportunity when he came in office to make the decision, and he went for a replay of the surge in iraq, which succeeded in iraq, but he did not give -- i am not sure weather it would have had any chance, but he supplied a number of troops much lower than with the commanders had asked for. it was supposed to be a sequential operation. the south and in the eas
the preoccupation of the committee and a preoccupation of the foreign policy and those concerned with foreign policy nationwide. why now? partly because this time we lost an ambassador and a great man. but mostly, it's because now benghazi isn't just a loss of diplomats, we have lost some before, but now there is a partisan advantage to be sought by one side or the other . this incident was an important, but is it more important than the north korean nuclear program? is it more important than the other subjects that haven't been the subject of so many hearings of this committee? we have now decided to focus on the politics security in part because we can blame one party or the other. we can blame the state department for not allocating its resources to diplomatic security or blame the republican congress for not appropriating the enough. we should do more for diplomatic security. this department should follow its own procedures, and we have not done so. we would like to believe in the world that is subject somehow to our control, that if we just do the right thing everything will turn out right. thi
of the 20th-century would bring as a major financial crisis and gulf was a foreign policy that would overextend us and undermine our national security. the government would have had to change in monetary system, shrink in size and scope, and reduce the unsustainable cost of policing the world. the problems seem to be overwhelming and impossible to solve, yet from my viewpoint, just following the constraints placed on the federal government by the constitution would have been a good place to start. just how much did i accomplished? in many ways, according to conventional wisdom, but often on a career in congress from 1976 to 2012 accomplished very little. no name legislation, no name federal buildings or highways. the government has grown exponentially. taxes remain excessive. a prolific increase of incomprehensible regulations continues. wars are constant, and pursued without congressional declaration. deficits rise to this guy. poverty is rampant. dependency on the federal government is now worse than any time in our history. all of this with minimal concerns the deficit and unfunde
dollar. for some time now, overseas resources have been cut or withheld, and important foreign policy objectives have been starved. consider that last year we spent approximately $650 billion on our military. by contrast, the international affairs budget is less than one-tenth of the pentagon's. secretary gates has spoken about this and strongly urged the congress to address that imbalance. we have not yet. admiral mullen pointed out, the more diplomacy is cut, the more lives are lost. we have to make certain that we are not penny-wise and pound-foolish when it comes to supporting americas vital overseas interests. adequately funding foreign-policy initiatives is not spending, but investing in our long-term security, and more often or not, it saves far more expensive expenditures in dollars and lives in the conflicts that we fail to see or avoid. we need to invest in america's long-term interest in order to do the job of diplomacy in a dangerous world. this report makes that crystal clear. since 1985, i have had the privilege of making official journeys to one trouble spot or another.
summers and peter norris said. of the foreign policy team, robert gates up to his eyeballs most of the bad things the country has done for decades. >> but he promised he would pull troops out of iraq so he falls through on his promise. >> so they do not take it seriously enough. we think it has been a big mistake. one thing he said is that cut back on the bush secrecy and has not followed through. with the espionage act was passed three people were indicted we were critical of many things but with the treatment of bradley manning it was very problematic but in some ways with bush and cheney for the war crimes committed so if you commit war crimes you walk free? if you expose then you are sentenced to jail? his policy is problematic. and with the case like yemen and then if it backfires the times square bombers. >> we have one minute left. >> not only as factual but what form policy should we have? what would you do? >> impassioned and a love of mankind and a purpose a century of the common man because the world can cooperate and has as a bigger shark but cooperating. >> if we have the rich
are making on the vigor transforming the role of the day so very unfortunate results. you talk about foreign policy as being at least two ideas or and although she's in play and i would be interested -- i keep on thinking that you are a vietnam analogy by and we must stand tough but you wouldn't subscribe to that. >> it's a special representation in the first place which dominates the rest of the book and in vietnam i think you have to take them both together. you cannot be in munich or vietnam. munich is an ethnology that tends to thrive when the country has been in peace and prosperity for long enough it feels it can do anything. it feels it can intervene on behalf of subject and oppressed people around the world and it doesn't think about the cost it hasn't had to pay the cost for several decades now. vietnam is about taking care of one's own the and paying attention to how things can go wrong despite the best of intentions. if he were a total vietnam person you will be such a realist that would be crude you wouldn't have anything on the interest and to the nation requires ideals for the
a half of his face because he's brilliant domestically, troubled on foreign policy. but he had a good side image so i think you could have half of him. >> can you do that? >> they can do do anything they want. >> she's the one -- >> half a face. >> so we've already talked about fdr. we've talked about truman. let's talk about reagan, a guy who when many people on the left thought he stumbled into office as an accident of history, few could expect this guy to be as transformative as he was. i would guess most historians 100 years from now will talk about the 20th century, they'll talk about fdr and reagan. >> well, there's no question. having created -- i mean, fdr creating a generation of liberal followers and reagan creating a generation of conservative followers, changing the whole idea of what we thought about government, whether one agrees or not, dealing with the cold war, being able to finally bring about that partnership with gorbachev, you know, take that wall down, the strength he showed, the communication ability, the fact that people felt optimistic during his time, the fac
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
. please stay tuned. we have another leadership crisis, this one in foreign policy. the russian president and vladimir putin signed bill banning adoptions by americans starting january 1st. it's likely 46 children who were to be adopted in the u.s. will have to remain in russia. on average about 900 children get adopted each year by americans in the soviet union, excuse me, from russia and there's been no formal response from the white house on this. here is former pentagon adviser michael rubin. >> thanks for having me, michelle. >> what should the white house do in response to this? >> ultimately, what with will have to be inspected and considered is the whole nature of the reset policy. if we trace the beginnings of this crisis back it actually started with the white house reaching out to vladimir putin to russia in supporting russia's accession to the world trade organization. the amendment which had govern the a lot of u.s.-russian/soviet relations going back to the 1970s had to be replaced. it was replaced in congress by the act which set russia's worst human viets violators there s
, remember, and this is one of my predictions, foreign policy could sneak up on us. whatever we think that everything is about domestic policy, it often turns out to be about foreign policy and president obama will get frustrated with congress. as a second term president he'll probably do what other second term presidents have done, focus on foreign policy. >> juliet: all right, and your final prediction has to do with neil cavuto. >> this i believe, neil cavuto will continue to lose bets to me. now, neil doesn't get up this early on sunday as you know, but i hope somebody tells him what the prediction is, it was crystal clear in the crystal ball. >> juliet: we'll get to get his reaction. >> dave: i'll tell him right now and try to get his reaction on twitter. thank you. is your car ready for the long winter ahead? what you should always keep handy to make sure you're safe on the roads, it's next. ♪ slow ride, take it easy ♪ this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr
, but a good man. host: i will let you take that. guest: a lot of foreign policy groups are opposed to him because they feel he is too critical to iran. another factor is the senate is a club. there is a lot of personality involved. there are a lot of prominent senators that do not like chuck hagel. i do not know what it is. he spoke his mind. that may bother a lot of people. there is a lot of intense opposition. the obama administration floated his name. i do not the that means the president is committed to nominating him. i think they put his name out to see the reaction. host: the caller said he believes president obama caves too much. guest: i am not sure if is a cave because they do not think president obama is that committed to nominating him i think he was willing to go through with the rice nomination, but she pulled out. there is always a calculation to be made as to how much political capital you want to spend in the nomination fight. i am told he was considering up anyway.e's name host: hilda solis is the secretary of labor. any indication she is thinking about going? guest: no,
on foreign relations, author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." and in washington, vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com and msnbc political analyst, richard wolffe. a minor round of applause for richard wolffe. >> one hand clapping. >> first of all, can anybody here come up with a synonym -- i don't care what it is -- so we don't have to employ the phrase "fiscal cliff" at all during the day? any ideas? anybody got any -- >> how about deadline? >> how about do your job. how about just do your job time. it is ridiculous. a little news, then we'll chatter about this. as if tax hikes and spending cuts weren't enough, there's a new reminder that the nation's debt ceiling is also hanging over the budget talks in washington. in a letter to congress yesterday, treasury secretary timothy geithner warned the government would hit its legal borrow i borrowing limit i limit by monday. geithner says the treasury will be forced to take, quote, extraordinary measures to keep paying the bills. he also referenced the impending fiscal cliff, which thr
the right pick? does that make him a defense expert? >> no. he is not a defense expert dave. foreign policy expert. what we need in a very complex world today ratcheted by wars in afghanistan. cyber war. threats from iran, north korea, china, et cetera. and a defense department has more than 3 million people scattered across this world. it's someone that really understands defense. someone that's spent their entire life working the bureaucracy that knows the industrial base that knows soldiers. you know, i have nothing against senator hagel. he is a fine man. i have met him before. i think he is well-intended. but what we need are people like michelle floornoid. ash hammer. we need people who know the systems inside-out. the president needs the best advice in a time of war and time of crisis. we are forcing says questions station. tenuous time for armed forces given all these threats. >> dave: after what john boehner said on friday it looks like sequestration could actually happen. the question is why does the president want chuck hagel. when you look at his background. maybe not a defense
us money, but also on emissions and helps us reduce our dependence on foreign oil and that is good for our national security. i think we need a comprehensive energy policy in this country in order to protect our national security, in order to ensure that we begin to clean up our environment better, and in order to make sure that we're not sending men and women overseas in harm's way for foreign oil. [applause] >> thank you. much to talk about. we are running just a little bit long. if he could indulge me, i have two last questions that i think you're terrific questions. the first, the truth is that we're one of the few democracies in the world that has not had a team of president. why and when will we? [laughter] and could she be sitting among us today? [laughter] kelly, would you like to start? [laughter] >> i think i will be campaigning for a patent daily, my daughter, for president. but absolutely, i think we will have a woman president. i really think it will certainly be in my lifetime if not soon. >> maybe 2016 when hillary runs. >> maybe. [laughter] [applause] >> did you hav
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)